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The-Early-Arrival-Birth-Story-Of-My-First-Baby

The Early Arrival Birth Story Of My First Baby

Some babies are keen to arrive before they're expected. Aisling Lyons tells us about the birth of her first child, who was born early.

I have three children and all of their births were very different experiences. From epidurals to natural labour to inducement to marvellous midwives and casual consultants, I feel like I have seen it all! However, I am going to start at the beginning, seven years ago, when my eldest child was born.

A break before the big event

By the time my daughter was conceived, Paul and I had agreed not to get married but to start a family. Like all first-time parents, people kept telling us to enjoy our freedom before our baby was born. We booked a weekend away for the start of February, three weeks before our baby’s due date. Paul surprised me with a marriage proposal during the mini break, and I accepted very tearfully (hormones you know!) We arranged an engagement party a couple of weeks later and we went out with all our friends and had a great night, leaving the party around 10.30pm as I was feeling exhausted.

The following morning, I felt rotten. I had mild tummy cramps and was generally feeling unwell. That weekend my (always procrastinating) fiancé was painting the nursery with my future brother-in-law. The pain worsened that day and I started to worry how I was going to cope with the impending labour in a few weeks. I stayed in bed and let the lads get on with it, getting out of bed every hour or so as moving around helped with the tummy cramps.

That afternoon, my sister Tara came to visit and to keep me company, but discreetly she was timing my cramps.

“So you’re getting these pains every 25 minutes… do you think you might be in labour?” “Of course not,” I said. “Sure, I’m not due for another three weeks. I reckon I just overdid it last night.”

It’s time

Tara (a homeopath) headed home to get some remedies that might offer me some relief. Paul left to drop his brother home. And that is when I had a show!

I called Holles Street and they told me to come in. I made some phonecalls to let my family know what was happening and then this wonderful calm descended. I hopped into the shower and made myself some toast while Tara and Paul rushed around gathering up everything, telling me to hurry up.

It was the day of the historic Ireland v England Six Nations game in Croke Park, so the roads were very quiet. We hightailed it into Holles Street, timing my contractions. We were admitted quickly and upon examination (1 cm dilated), I was brought straight to the delivery suite. The contractions were as bad as I had expected, but I didn’t know you had to wait for them to get really bad before your epidural was administered.

Probably the worst part of the whole experience was trying to keep still during a contraction whilst the anaesthetist delivered the wonderful calm-in-a-syringe that was my epidural. Staying still during a contraction is virtually impossible!

Smooth entrance

It was plain sailing from there on in – I drifted in and out of sleep, chatted to Paul, listened to the radio, whilst our wonderful midwife worked constantly and quietly in the background. Then she said “Okay, it’s time!” Paul grabbed one leg, I grabbed the other and after only nine minutes of pushing, my beautiful, healthy, baby girl was born. She was put straight onto my chest for skin-to-skin contact and I fell in love immediately. Whilst delivering the placenta I watched Paul hold her with the most amazing look of wonder on his face. All that was left to do was call work and tell them I wouldn’t be in!

Mother of three, Aisling Lyons (aka Babysteps) from Co. Wicklow, has over 20 years’ experience in the childcare sector. The aim of her blog is to help any parents who are struggling with the little and large problems that parenting young children can bring: aisolyons.wordpress.com

Want to share your birth story with us? Just email editor@easyparenting.ie!


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