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Your toddler’s top 5 bathroom dilemmas

Toddlers are notorious for doing what they want to – and not much else. Because parenting a toddler isn’t always easy, we’ve compiled some quick fixes for the mishaps of the day that seem to be the most stressful of all – bathing and grooming.

Problem: Your toddler refuses to take a bath

Dirt makes him happy and he doesn’t want to wash off his messy face masterpiece. Bath crayons might perk his interest. Just remember to wash it off immediately because sometimes it can be tricky to get off if left overnight. You could also try measuring cups as bath toys, which can be more fun than their own toys sometimes!

Problem: Your child stuck something up his nose

The first time he does this, you’ll likely flip and head to the hospital, but the truth is that it’s usually not serious. You can encourage your child to blow his nose if he knows how; get items you can see out with tweezers or cover his mouth with yours and give a quick burst of air. This will sometimes send the lodged object flying out. If it goes up into the nostril where you cannot see it, it will either make its way out the nose or down the back of the throat with nasal drainage. If you are concerned, consult your doctor.

Problem: Tangled hair… and tears

Tangled hair is no fun! Try a quick detangling spray after washing and shampooing hair. Remember to focus on the tangle first when combing and pay close attention to the brush you use. Some can be more painful than others. Softer bristled brushes, as opposed to plastic bristles, can be easier on tender noggins.

Problem: The poo picker

When toddlers are gearing up for toilet training, poo can really start to be a major pet peeve for them. So what’s the solution in his mind? To get the diaper off and the poo out! But with still-developing motor skills, his fingers are an easier tool than wipes. Explaining not to “pick poo” is seldom helpful, but you have to try each time.

Problem: Tooth brushing tantrums

As soon as the first tooth buds, it seems like tooth brushing is the furthest thing from your child’s mind. When they are only a few months old, the toothbrush seems like more of a toy than a tool. They want to hold it, slurp it, chew it – but they do not want you to brush their teeth with it! This can be very frustrating, especially as teeth care gets more important with each passing month.

By the time they reach the toddler years, it seems like they are too busy to brush their teeth. Some kids will let you give their teeth a quick scrub – if you can catch them – and others will fight brushing tooth and nail.

If your child is giving you ‘toothbrush grief’, read on to find a few helpful tips and tricks that have worked for other frazzled moms.

Make it fun: Tooth brushing is about as fun as watching paint dry, but with a few little tricks you can make it a little more exciting. Decide on a toothbrushing song that you can sing while brushing, while your toddler does some actions – or look for toothbrushes that play music while they brush, light up or make sounds.

Try a reward chart: Toddlers over two years may connect with the concept of getting a sticker for every time they successfully brush.

Switch toothpastes: Sometimes the reason for grief is because your toddler simply doesn’t like the taste of the toothpaste. Try a different brand, but remember to never brush your toddler’s teeth with adult toothpaste. Toddler toothpaste is usually safe to swallow, but toothpastes made for adults or older children can be problematic if too much is ingested.


If your child refuses to brush and you continue to have trouble with your child’s dental care, consult your doctor or dentist. They will be able to guide you in the right direction and help you keep your child’s teeth looking clean and healthy.
Remember, you are not alone
Toddlers run on emotion and are natural born explorers. To them, it’s perfectly normal to stick the rubber duck in the toilet to see if it will float or sink. They want to know how many beads they can fit in one side of their nose and what happens if they put the cat on their slide. It’s all a natural form of expression, but don’t worry. Before you know it, they will be entering the preschool years, which are much easier on moms and tots!

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